The Dilley Pro Bono Project

On November 2, 2019, I am embarking on a weeklong pro bono mission near our country’s southern border in Dilley, Texas.  The largest family detention center, the South Texas Family Residential Center, is found in this fairly remote town about an hour and a half drive from San Antonio.  This endeavor is part of the Dilley Pro Bono Project, offered through the American Immigration Council.  The Dilley Pro Bono Project provides legal representation to mothers and children seeking asylum from extreme violence in Central America and other locations.  More information about the project can be found at their website.

Licensed attorneys are one of the few groups permitted to volunteer in detention centers.  I will be one of a five attorney team on-site for the week, along with other attorneys committed to public interest causes.  Three of us will have translators, and two are Spanish speaking.  

As an advocate for children and families in my home state and local community, I feel a sense of duty to do what I can to assist the children and families seeking asylum at the border. I plan to post more about the project and trip prior to my departure and after I return. Continue to visit our blog for those updates in the coming months. 

How You Can Help

I am aware that some of you would like to join our team by contributing to the project.  The organizers of our team have set up a Go Fund Me page to support our team’s work during the week we are there.  Funds will be used to cover hotel and flights for translators who need assistance, the rental of two vans to transport our team on the ground, and if there are additional funds, to assist with hotel costs for the other team members.  Anything raised in excess of these expenses will be provided to other teams doing this work.  If you would like to contribute to this cause, you can do so by visiting our Go Fund Me page here.  Thank you in advance for your support. 

Angie 

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